The Anglican Catholic Blog

The Anglican Catholic is a new blog, which I hope will become quasi-official in our Church and run in a totally different spirit to that of this personal blog. Please stop and view the About page, because this gives the initial spirit. This page also gives instructions for those who wish to become contributors. Essentially, if you fit the stated requirement and send me your e-mail address privately, you will be sent an invitation to become a contributor. Follow instructions for obtaining your password directly from WordPress. This blog site is user-friendly and easy to learn to use as a contributor.

When I was in England for the Synod and my reception at the hands of Bishop Damien Mead, we discussed this possibility together with Deacon Jonathan Munn. We agreed that the blog should be quite “high-brow” intellectually and that polemics should be avoided as much as possible. The objective is raising the profile of our Church in mainstream society, which we do by being ourselves and being “what it says on the tin lid“.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to The Anglican Catholic Blog

  1. Michael Frost says:

    Father, In regard to your stated desire–“We agreed that the blog should be quite “high-brow” intellectually and that polemics should be avoided as much as possible. The objective is raising the profile of our Church in mainstream society”–I’m sure we all wish you the very best in your endeavor! I’m betting it will be accessibly “high brow” and reasonably “non-polemic”. [Here I think of two American ecumenical periodicals as possible examples: First Things and Touchstone. I do hope you discuss the best and brightest of the wide variety of historical Anglicanism, and get back to the founders (Henry VIII, Cranmer, Ridley, Hooper, Bucer, Elizabeth & James, Parker, Hooker, etc.), later historical people & their thoughts (e.g., Laud, the Non-jurors, the Wesleys, Pusey, Lewis, etc.), sources (39 Articles, BCP, hymal, Ecclesiastical Polity, etc.), and historical issues (e.g., the impact of the Restoration and later Glorious Revolution, Tractarians, the discussions about dogma and liturgics in the 1920s). If only the various heirs of the Reformation would seriously engage their roots and history.]

  2. Pingback: The Anglican Catholic | Fr Stephen Smuts

  3. Pingback: Fr. Orthohippo

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s