News from the Traditional Anglican Communion in England

I received this message by e-mail just now. I wish the TAC well in its Continuing Anglican apostolate and I will keep Bishop Gray and his flock in the UK and Bishop Pope and his people in Australia in my prayers. Update: See this page of the TACB’s official website.

* * *

Photographed here are Bishop Michael Pope (left) and Bishop Ian Gray (right) after their Consecration at St. Katherine’s Pro- Cathedral Church, Lincoln, England.

Photographed here are Bishop Michael Pope (left) and Bishop Ian Gray (right) after their Consecration at St. Katherine’s Pro- Cathedral Church, Lincoln, England.

PRESS RELEASE
For Immediate Release

From The Traditional Anglican Church in Britain.

In one of the most significant moves since numbers of Anglicans left the Church of England in protest at its acceptance of women into its priesthood, traditional Anglicans gathered in the city of Lincoln to celebrate the consecration of two new Bishops for the worldwide Traditional Anglican movement.

They are the former Vicar–General of the Traditional Anglican Church in Britain, the Very Rev’d Ian Gray, who is based in Lincoln, and the Very Rev’d Michael Pope of the Anglican Catholic Church in Australia which, like the Lincoln- based community, is also an element of the Traditional Anglican Communion.

The ceremony, on October 18th, was presided over by The Most Reverend Samuel Prakash, Metropolitan of the Anglican Church of India, and Acting Primate of the Traditional Anglican Communion. The event was attended by supporters from TAC parishes from within Britain, together with visiting guests – clergy and laity – from The United States of America, Australia, Canada, India and South Africa.

Representing a milestone in the history and growth of what have often been labelled the Continuing Churches, this unique ceremony took place in England at the Pro-Cathedral Church of St. Katherine which forms part of the city’s Priory Trust complex – less than a mile from Lincoln’s ancient Church of England Cathedral.

The ceremony took place at a Celebration of Holy Communion led by Bishop Craig Botterill, Episcopal Visitor to the TAC in Britain and Suffragan Bishop of the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada.

The Epistle was read by Bishop Stephen Strawn, Bishop Ordinary of the Anglican Church in America’s Diocese of the Missouri Valley. The Gospel was read by Bishop Shane Janzen, the Metropolitan and Bishop Ordinary of the Anglican Church of Canada.

The sermon, which drew on the history and significance of Lincoln to the Christian Faith and the role of Bishops in the modern world, was given by Bishop David Robarts O.A.M. of the Anglican Church in Australia.

The two Bishops Elect – The Very Rev’d Ian Gray and the Very Rev’d Michael Pope – were formally presented to Archbishop Prakash and, having made their Oaths of Obedience to him, each, in turn, was presented to the congregation. The Litany was sung by Bishop Brian Marsh, Presiding Bishop of the Anglican Church in America, and in accordance with tradition the Archbishop with Bishops Robarts and Botterill, laid hands on both men as prayers were offered for the assistance of the Holy Spirit in their future roles.

The mission of the Traditional Anglican Church in Britain is to recall Anglicanism to its heritage, to heal divisions caused by departures from the faith and to build a vibrant church for the future based on powerful local leadership.

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8 Responses to News from the Traditional Anglican Communion in England

  1. Forgive me for being pessimistic in relation to the comments “to build a vibrant church for the future based on powerful local leadership” and in this case I am looking to the country I am living in Australia. I have clearly stated that I have made some unfair criticism of the Anglican Catholic Church of Australia and certain members of their clergy, I have made a sincere apology to all concerned and yet I am treated like dirt, not even a reply from the clergy concerned that they have forgiven me. The issues was not even that serious. I served the Lord Jesus Christ with Bishop Robarts, then Vicar of Christ Church Brunswick at altar for nine years, I have served at the altar with Fr Graeme Mitchell, the new Dean here in Australia, but am in for the silent treatment. How can I really take the ordinations seriously?

    What about if one of us is suddenly called to appear before the throne of God, how can we stand there if we are not prepared to forgive one another or make an effort to renew the bond that once existed between us?

    Lord, have mercy upon us.

    Father Ed Bakker

    • I have no such grievance myself. Both Archbishop Prakash and Canon (now Bishop) Gray were very kind with me when I was “orphaned” when the Patrimony of the Primate ceased to exist and Archbishop Hepworth was no longer anyone for the TAC – as was Bishop Gill in South Africa. I crossed over to the ACC with Canon Gray’s blessing.

      I have my own thoughts and reserves about things, but I do believe that the TAC in the UK and Australia should have the chance to try to rebuild and keep the objective in sight of fostering the continuation of Anglicanism in some shape or form. We should not let our personal sufferings cloud issues.

      I put up this article with a positive attitude and let them speak for themselves. We are called to do our own work in our own Church and try to teach through example rather than reproach. I think it’s the least to expect from any of us in a big hostile world. I wish them the best, and no prayer is ever “wasted”.

      • I appreciated your response Father Anthony, I have now issues offcourse with Canon Gray now made a Bishop. You have been treated well, I agree, so it is not too difficult to write such a positive note. Unfortunately there are some issues going on in the background of which you are not aware and as I am a strong believer in Jesus’s commandment :” Love one another, as I have loved you”, Then we must put this into practice, following this commandment is not a one way street , it has to come from both parties. I am living close to the Anglican Catholic Church of Australia and the issue I raised hurts me deeply. I will pray that I may worry less about it and carry out my duties as a Priest as well as I can.

        If you want to talk to me about some of these issues , I am happy to talk to you on the Skype phone, my id being fatheredbakker1955

        The silence treatment I am getting , this is something that can destroy a person if you are not careful. Thank you Margaret ( I don’t know you ) for your prayers.

        Father Ed Bakker

      • The silence treatment I am getting , this is something that can destroy a person if you are not careful.

        It is an ascetic discipline some of us have to accept. Monks in their monasteries, a solitary seaman in his boat on a long voyage. This is something we have to learn, and it’s very hard. We come out all the stronger for it. Read the Rule of St Benedict and the value of silence, and the degrees of humility.

        We all have so much to learn.

      • ed pacht says:

        “It is not a one way street. It has to come from both parties.” One would wish that were so, but all too often it is not. When love is not reciprocated, what does one do? “Love one another as I have loved you.” “…loved us while we were yet sinners…” I cannot force another to love, but I can love one who will not love me. The single hardest word of the Gospel is that I must, and that being “persecuted for righteousness’ sake” is blessedness. I’ve had occasion more than once to be reminded of this and to learn (with divine assistance) to do what I cannot in my own strength – to love the unlovable, and to rejoice when mistreated. No, Father, my love, if I be Christlike is, more often than not, a one way street after all, or should be. I can only pray that what God shows in me may be used somehow to spark a change in the other, but whether this comes to be or not, I am responsible for what I do and think, but not for what another does or thinks.

      • Hello Ed ,

        Very much appreciate what you are telling me. If we are to lead a Christ like life , then it is indeed a matter of love flowing one way. Unfortunately my personal circumstances and location have led to me making the unfortunate comment in the past and the need to be forgiven. Even if there was a response to that effect and a comment , sorry but am very busy with other things now. Anyway it was good to get the matter of my chest , I don’t have that many outlets as such, this is the truth indeed.

        It does come down to the fact that we are all sinners and we let each other down, but a Christ like love should really restore matters. I personally find it hard to serve with a Priest at the altar for nine years and not missing a Sunday and then getting the silent treatment is if we have never had an association in Christ. Anyway thank you and Fr.Anthony. Shall carry on.

        Father Ed Bakker

  2. Margaret says:

    I am so sorry to hear you have been mistreated, Father. You are in my prayers………

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